Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and cognitive function in the Age-Related Eye Disease Studies 1 & 2.

Julie Mares // Publications // Jun 01 2020

PubMed ID: 32285590

Author(s): Keenan TD, Agrón E, Mares JA, Clemons TE, van Asten F, Swaroop A, Chew EY; AREDS and AREDS2 Research Groups. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and cognitive function in the Age-Related Eye Disease Studies 1 & 2. Alzheimers Dement. 2020 Jun;16(6):831-842. doi: 10.1002/alz.12077. Epub 2020 Apr 13. PMID 32285590

Journal: Alzheimer’s & Dementia : The Journal Of The Alzheimer’s Association, Volume 16, Issue 6, 06 2020

INTRODUCTION The objective was to determine whether closer adherence to the alternative Mediterranean Diet (aMED) was associated with altered cognitive function.

METHODS Observational analyses of participants (n = 7,756) enrolled in two randomized trials of nutritional supplements for age-related macular degeneration: Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and AREDS2.

RESULTS Odds ratios for cognitive impairment, in aMED tertile 3 (vs 1), were 0.36 (P = .0001) for Modified Mini-Mental State (<80) and 0.56 (P = .001) for composite score in AREDS, and 0.56 for Telephone Interview Cognitive Status-Modified (<30) and 0.48 for composite score (each P < .0001) in AREDS2. Fish intake was associated with higher cognitive function. In AREDS2, rate of cognitive decline over 5 to 10 years was not significantly different by aMED but was significantly slower (P = .019) with higher fish intake.

DISCUSSION Closer Mediterranean diet adherence was associated with lower risk of cognitive impairment but not slower decline in cognitive function. Apolipoprotein E (APOE) haplotype did not influence these relationships.

© 2020 Alzheimer’s Association. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.