Anti-seizure effects of walnut peptides in mouse models of induced seizure: The involvement of GABA and nitric oxide pathways.

Publications // Sheibani Lab // Jul 16 2021

PubMed ID: 34333374

Author(s): Jahanbani R, Bahramnejad E, Rahimi N, Shafaroodi H, Sheibani N, Moosavi-Movahedi AA, Dehpour AR, Vahdati K. Anti-seizure effects of walnut peptides in mouse models of induced seizure: The involvement of GABA and nitric oxide pathways. Epilepsy Res. 2021 Jul 16;176:106727. doi: 10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2021.106727. [Epub ahead of print] PMID 34333374

Journal: Epilepsy Research, Volume 176, Jul 2021

Epilepsy is one of the foremost medical disorders. Oxidative stress is a well-known mechanism in epileptogenesis, and many studies suggest that oxidative stress affects the onset and evolution of epilepsy. Here we evaluated the walnut peptide extracts’ anti-seizure property in three different mouse seizure models including pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizure, chemical kindling, and maximal electroshock. Walnut peptides (20 mg/Kg) were administered by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of mice 60 min before seizure induction in the three models. To delineate the mechanisms of walnut peptides anti-seizure activity, we evaluated the impact of diazepam, flumazenil, and a NOS inhibitor on this activity. Intraperitoneal administration of walnut peptides significantly increased the seizure threshold. Our results also demonstrated that walnut peptides exert their anti-seizure properties through the modulation of benzodiazepine receptors. Thus, walnut peptides may be considered as a new anti-convulsion agent, which can reduce seizure occurrence and slow down seizure progression.

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