glaucoma

EDUCATION FOR CLINICAL PROFESSIONALS

Residents and faculty present and discuss various case studies with the goal of improving clinical care practice.  Held weekly throughout the year, Grand Rounds offers continuing Medical Education (CME) credit for ophthalmologists and Continuing Education (CE) credit for optometrists.

THIS WEEK’s presentation:

What’s New in Glaucoma Care: 2 Drugs and 2 Procedures”

Gregg Heatley, MD, MMM

 

Anna Momont, MD

 

Christopher Pruet, MD

 

 

 STATEMENT OF ACCREDITATION
In support of improving patient care, the University of Wisconsin-Madison ICEP is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME),the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

CREDIT DESIGNATION STATEMENT
The University of Wisconsin-Madison ICEP designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Crosstalk of transforming growth factor beta-2 and toll-like receptor 4 in the trabecular meshwork

Join us in welcoming, Colleen McDowell, PhD, Assistant Professor at North Texas Eye Research Institute with her presentation (title above). Frontiers in Vision Research is a collective exploration into the ever-changing landscape of sight saving discovery with colleagues and peers from across the globe.

About Dr. McDowell’s Research

One of the major risk factors for the development of glaucoma is an increased pressure inside the eye. An increase of pressure occurs in the eye when fluid is not drained properly through the drainage structures in the front of the eye. Research in my laboratory aims to understand what regulates the arrangement and construction of the drainage structures and how changes in this makeup prevent proper drainage in the eye. In addition, the buildup of pressure in the eye can damage the visual sensing structures in the back of the eye, leading to blindness. My laboratory also studies specific subtypes of cells in the visual sensing structures of the eye that are more or less susceptible to glaucoma damage. These experiments will help identify pathways of destruction that will serve as new targets for the development of effective glaucoma treatments, and may also lead to the discovery of more sensitive ways to diagnose glaucoma and follow glaucoma progression.

We encourage you to join us before the program for APPETIZERS, refreshments and networkinG!