Pediatric Ophthalmology Fellowship

Saving sight for a lifetime

Why Choose Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Fellowship at UW Madison?

Our patients, orthoptists, schedulers, residents, researchers, technicians, faculty, staff and administration will all tell you – because we care. We care for them, for each other and for the next generation through our educational, research and clinical endeavors. Don’t take our word for it.

 

Doctors in El Salvador

Research Intensive

Our fellows receive financial and advisory support to complete their own clinical research project, and participate in a range of other research opportunities, including a one-week surgical rotation in El Salvador.

Hands-On Experience

Our clinics boast more than 7,000 sub-specialty outpatient visits per year, and our fellows see over 400 surgical cases during their training—many as primary surgeons.

Expert Guidance

Our fellows work closely with six pediatric ophthalmologists with over 100 years of experience in patient care and collaborate with faculty, clinicians, and residents across the department.

Drs. Lucarelli, Burckhard and Gurwin at the Oculoplastics Skills Course 2020

Comprehensive Training

Fellows gain experience in over 400 surgical procedures and over 45 different types of surgical interventions,  with a strong focus on strabismus, as well as evaluation and surgical management of retinopathy of prematurity, cataract, glaucoma, ptosis, and nasolacrimal procedures.

Looking for a childhood surgeon of mine...

A former pediatric patient reaches out

Hello! I hope this email finds you well. My name is C. I’m reaching out trying to find an ophthalmologist of mine that I had as a young girl. I know this is a long shot because you have tons of patients and would have seen me over 21 years ago, but your history lines up so close to who I’m looking for. I was born with congenital cataracts and was operated on at The University of Minnesota Children’s Hospital between the years of 1996-2000. My brother also had congenital cataracts and was operated on by you. My lens implant also slipped out of its pocket and had to be re-operated on if that sets me apart!

Anyway, I remember my surgeon telling me (jokingly) that if I could drive by the time I was 16, she would pay for my license registration. I just wanted to thank you because I have done that and more. You enriched my life and gave me the opportunity to graduate from college, get married, have a career, travel and SEE the world, read several books, and live a very fulfilling life. I even married a guy who has amblyopia in the opposite eye as me! I also know that if my children are born with congenital cataracts, they will be okay and thrive. You especially showed me that women can be powerful, driving forces in medicine and in the world. I learned so much from you in those few years that I still carry with me today.

 

If I found the wrong surgeon, I apologize, but I’m sure you have also inspired and helped several girls like me throughout your career!

 

So thank you for helping change the world for several young children and families in a time where things are scary and uncertain, C. (a former patient of Dr. Terri Young)

You won’t be standing on the sidelines. You’ll be saving sight from day one.

 

What Can You Expect as a Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Fellow?

 

Hands-On Clinical Experience and Expert Guidance

The Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Fellowship is a one-year fellowship that offers comprehensive training in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus. As a fellow, you’ll work closely with seven pediatric ophthalmologists, with over 80 years of experience in patient care, in the Pediatric Eye Clinic of the UW and the American Family Children’s Hospital (AFCH), which fields more than 7,000 sub-specialty outpatient visits per year.

At our clinics, we see a wide variety of pediatric eye problems thanks to a high volume of referrals and consultations from our large Pediatric Department—a vibrant, clinical and research-centered department that includes all relevant subspecialties. We also have a wide national and international referral base for treating complex strabismus in children and adults. As a fellow, you will be involved in over 400 surgical cases, many as a primary surgeon, and you’ll participate in the evaluation and surgical management of retinopathy of prematurity, cataract, glaucoma, ptosis, and nasolacrimal procedures. And given our nationally and internationally recognized reputation for treating complex strabismus, our surgical procedures also include a wide variety of strabismus surgeries.

More Orthoptists Than Any Other Program

Our orthoptists are a highlight of our pediatrics training and the support we offer for fellows in our clinic. We have four orthoptists in our clinic at any point in time, more than any other clinic in the United States, and we boast a long tradition of working with our orthoptists as clinical partners who independently evaluate patients, collaborate in clinical research, and participate in educating residents and fellows.

Dr. Terri Young's Genetics Lab at UW-Madison

Outstanding Research Opportunities

As a fellow, you will initiate and complete an independent research project appropriate for presentation at a national meeting during your fellowship, and additional funds are available to further support you in pursuing educational and research engagement opportunities. You’ll participate in a regular didactic lecture program that includes a basic lecture science series, journal club, and presentation of research projects. As part of the fellowship, you’ll also gain additional expertise in the field of ophthalmic genetics through participation in a monthly inherited retinal degeneration clinic, and you’ll also have research opportunities in areas such as oculocutaneous albinism, myopia, primary congenital glaucoma, and human embryonic stem cells. Many of our fellows also choose to conduct research with other faculty within the Department and outside of Pediatrics.

Meet Our Pediatric Ophthalmology Faculty

Yasmin S. Bradfield, MD

John W. Doolittle Pediatric Ophthalmology Professor

David M. Gamm, MD, PhD

Professor, Director of the McPherson Eye Research Institute

Terri L. Young, MD, MBA, FARVO

Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Peter A. Duehr Professor of Ophthalmology, Pediatrics and Medical Genetics

Bikash Pattnaik, PhD, MPhil

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

Leadership in Strabismus Research and Clinical Care

Dr. Yasmin Bradfield headshot

Thanks to our national and international reputation in the research and treatment of complex strabismus, fellows have the opportunity to gain extensive, up close clinical and research experience in the field of strabismus. Our staff has been involved in leading research in both clinical and basic science. You will work closely with Dr. Yasmin Bradfield, Dr. Michael Struck, Dr. Alexander Miranda, and other clinicians and researchers leading the charge on strabismus treatment. We have a wide referral base, both nationally and internationally, for treating complex strabismus in children and adults, and our surgical procedures include a wide variety of strabismus surgeries.

Working closely with our other pediatric ophthalmologists, you’ll also gain knowledge and experience in other pediatric ophthalmology subspecialties—from Dr. Terri L. Young’s work on pediatric glaucoma and myopia, to Dr. Melanie Schmitt’s work on inherited retinal degenerations, to Dr. David Gamm’s work with stem cell therapies for pediatrics. You’ll also have the opportunity to work with Professor Emeritus Burt Kushner, who has treated multiple generations of strabismus patients in his 40 years of clinical practice in Madison and has been actively involved in training fellows for over 45 years.

Learn about the fellowship from Director, Dr. Michael Struck and Professor Emeritus, Dr. Burt Kushner

 

Clinical Fellowship Didactic Schedule

WEEK TOPIC FACULTY
1 Department Welcome and Orientation
2 Optics/Retinoscopy Struck
3 Sensory Exam Gamm
4 Amblyopia Schmitt
5 Special tests Bradfield
6 Accommodative Esotropia Schmitt
7 Nonaccommodative Acquired Esotropia Struck
8 Esotropia Treatment Options Bradfield
9 Exotropia Evaluation Struck
10 Extropia Treatment Options Gamm
11 Journal Club Fellow
12 A & V Pattern Strab Kushner
13 Vertical Bradfield
14 Nystagmus Schmitt
15 Fellow Interviews
16 El Salvador Mission
17 Orbit & Eyelids; NLDO Gamm
18 Corneal Dz; Iris abnl Struck
19 AAO
20 Infectious Disease Schmitt
21 Motor Physiology Bradfield
22 Vision Development Struck
23 Journal Club  Fellow
24 Evaluating the Blind Eye Gamm
25 Cataracts Schmitt
26 Uveitis Bradfield
27 POND: Optic Disc Abnormality Struck
28 Pseudotumor and Disc Elevation Gamm
29 Trauma Schmitt
30 Incommitant Strabismus Bradfield
31 Local Anesthesia for Strab Surgery Struck
32 Pediatric Glaucoma Bradfield
33 ROP Schmitt
34 Journal Club  Fellow
35 Cranial Nerve 6 Palsy Schmitt
36 Cranial Nerve 3 Palsy Bradfield
37 Thyroid Eye Disease Gamm
38 Scleral Buckle/Orbital Fracture/Seton Strab Surgery Struck
39 Surgery techniques (mini-tenotomy, recess/resect)
40 Brown’s Syndrome Bradfield
41 Strabismus reops/imaging Struck
42 To be determined
43 AAPOS
44 Hereditary Retinal Disease Schmitt
45  To be determined
46 Orbital/Ocular Tumors Gamm
47 Research Day
48 Journal Club Fellow

 

THE BASICS

Director: Michael C. Struck, MD
Parent Department or Academic Unit: University of Wisconsin Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
Address: Pediatric Ophthalmology

2870 University Avenue, Suite 206

Madison, WI 53705-3611

Telephone: (608) 263-6429
Preceptor Names: DOVS Faculty

Orthoptists

 

 

  • Kristin Anderson, CO
  • Leslie France, CO
  • Nora Haji-Jama, CO
  • Michele Harn, CO
  • Kali Loberger, CO
Primary Clinical Training Site: University Station Clinics

2880 University Avenue

Madison, WI 53705-3631

Length of Fellowship: 1 Year
Numbers of positions/year: 1
Starting Date: July 1
Application Deadline: September 1
Actively Involved in Resident Education: Yes
Research Required: Yes, Clinical
Block Time assigned to Research: Reference didactic schedule (above)

Pediatric Ophthalmology News

 

AS OCT

Dec 01 2020

To investigate whether anatomical differences in Schlemm’s canal and anterior segment structures are associated with the development of glaucoma in pediatric patients that undergo cataract surgery.

Read More

MYOPIA

Dec 01 2020

To identify genes that are involved in eye growth specifically in individuals and families with nearsightedness (myopia).

Read More

GENETIC EYE DISORDERS

Dec 01 2020

To identify the gene or genes responsible for developmental causes of blindness in the world, and to establish a Pediatric Ophthalmic Genetics and Research Program at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Read More

XOLARIS

Dec 01 2020

To gain a better understanding of disease progression over time in male subjects with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP).

Read More

CHM SURVEY TRIAL

Dec 01 2020

To assess health-related quality of life, health utility, work productivity, and impact on daily activities in patients/caregivers with CHM at different stages of disease progression.

Read More

Impact of Amblyopia on the Central Nervous System.

Nov 18 2020

PubMed ID: 33206009 Author(s): Miller NP, Aldred B, Schmitt MA, Rokers B. Impact of Amblyopia on the Central Nervous System. J Binocul Vis Ocul Motil. 2020 Nov 18:1-11. doi: 10.1080/2576117X.2020.1841710. [Epub ahead of print] PMID…

Read More