Nutrient supplements contribute to the dietary intake of middle- and older-aged adult residents of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin.

Kleins Lab // Publications // Feb 01 1993

PubMed ID: 8429366

Author(s): Mares-Perlman JA, Klein BE, Klein R, Ritter LL, Freudenheim JL, Luby MH. Nutrient supplements contribute to the dietary intake of middle- and older-aged adult residents of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. J Nutr. 1993 Feb;123(2):176-88.

Journal: The Journal Of Nutrition, Volume 123, Issue 2, Feb 1993

Intake of macronutrients and micronutrients was estimated from a diet history questionnaire in a population-based sample of persons (n = 2152), 43-86 y of age. Men and women 65 y of age or older consumed less protein, fat, cholesterol, niacin, riboflavin, calcium, iron, zinc and lycopene than their middle-aged counterparts. After including nutrient intake from supplements, age differences in intake were no longer significant for zinc in women or for niacin and iron in men. After further adjusting for energy intake, only protein, cholesterol, and lycopene mean intakes were lower in older compared with middle-aged men and women. Regular use of supplements was most prevalent among older men and women (40 and 48%, respectively). Supplement use was greater in the current time period compared with retrospective reports of supplement use 10 y before interview. The impact of supplement intake on median values of intake was greatest in women, particularly for vitamins A, C and E, riboflavin and calcium. The high prevalence of supplement use emphasizes the importance of considering this source of nutrients in future investigations in which dietary intake is measured.