Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: transgenic animal studies.

Anne Griep // Publications // May 01 1994

PubMed ID: 8183959

Author(s): Griep AE, Lambert PF. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: transgenic animal studies. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1994 May;206(1):24-34. Review.

Journal: Proceedings Of The Society For Experimental Biology And Medicine. Society For Experimental Biology And Medicine (New York, N.Y.), Volume 206, Issue 1, May 1994

Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice.