Alcohol consumption and the 5-year incidence of age-related maculopathy: the Beaver Dam eye study.

Kleins Lab // Publications // May 21 1998

PubMed ID: 9593377

Author(s): Moss SE, Klein R, Klein BE, Jensen SC, Meuer SM. Alcohol consumption and the 5-year incidence of age-related maculopathy: the Beaver Dam eye study. Ophthalmology. 1998 May;105(5):789-94.

Journal: Ophthalmology, Volume 105, Issue 5, May 1998

OBJECTIVE This study evaluated alcohol consumption as a risk factor for incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM).

DESIGN Persons aged 43 to 86 years in 1988 in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, were examined from 1988 through 1990 and 1993 through 1995, n = 3684. The presence and severity of ARM at both examinations were determined from gradings of stereoscopic fundus photographs using the Wisconsin Age-related Maculopathy Classification System. Alcohol consumption was determined by self-report.

RESULTS Men drinking at least 78 g/week of alcohol from beer had a higher 5-year age-adjusted incidence of early ARM (10.6%) than did men who did not drink beer (6.9%), but the test for trend was only borderline significant (P = 0.08). However, incidence of soft indistinct drusen (P = 0.01), increased drusen area (P < 0.01), and confluent drusen (P = 0.02) are all associated with beer drinking in men. Increased retinal pigment and retinal pigment epithelial depigmentation are not associated with beer drinking in men or women nor are any lesions associated with total alcohol consumption or consumption from liquor or wine in either men or women.

CONCLUSIONS Except for an association of beer drinking with retinal drusen in men, consumption of alcoholic beverages is not likely to be an important risk factor for incidence of ARM.