Intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide inhibits choroidal neovascularization in a laser-treated rat model.

Publications // Ronald Danis // Mar 01 2001

PubMed ID: 11231773

Author(s): Ciulla TA, Criswell MH, Danis RP, Hill TE. Intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide inhibits choroidal neovascularization in a laser-treated rat model. Arch Ophthalmol. 2001 Mar;119(3):399-404. PMID 11231773

Journal: Archives Of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), Volume 119, Issue 3, Mar 2001

OBJECTIVE To determine if intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (TAAC) inhibits experimental choroidal neovascular membranes induced by laser trauma in a rat model.

METHODS Nineteen anesthetized male Brown Norway rats received a series of 8 krypton red laser lesions per eye (647 nm, 0.05 seconds, 50 microm, and 150 mW in 17 rats, and 200 mW in 2 rats). One eye received an intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide (20 microL, 0.8 mg) and the other eye received an injection of isotonic sodium chloride solution. Fundus and fluorescein angiography examinations occurred just before euthanasia and tissue processing for histopathology on day(s) 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35.

RESULTS From the control eyes that underwent photocoagulation at 150 mW, 57 discrete lesions with definitive fibrovascular proliferations were observed at 21, 28, and 35 days, arising from a total of 72 spots placed (79% yield). From the control eyes that underwent photocoagulation at 200 mW, 11 discrete lesions with definitive fibrovascular proliferations were observed at 28 days, arising from a total of 16 spots placed (69% yield). In the TAAC-treated group, no fibrovascular proliferations were observed in the 72 lesions and in the 16 lesions created with 150 mW and 200 mW, respectively.

CONCLUSION Intravitreal TAAC is a potent inhibitor of fibrovascular proliferations in a rat model of choroidal neovascular membranes induced by laser trauma.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE This study corroborates previous investigations that propose TAAC as a potential treatment for choroidal neovascular membranes in humans.