Aging of the human lens: changes in lens shape upon accommodation and with accommodative loss.

Kaufman Lab // Publications // Jan 01 2002

PubMed ID: 11778717

Author(s): Koretz JF, Cook CA, Kaufman PL. Aging of the human lens: changes in lens shape upon accommodation and with accommodative loss. J Opt Soc Am A Opt Image Sci Vis. 2002 Jan;19(1):144-51. PMID 11778717

Journal: Journal Of The Optical Society Of America. A, Optics, Image Science, And Vision, Volume 19, Issue 1, Jan 2002

Accommodation in the human eye occurs through controlled changes in crystalline lens shape, thickness, and refractive surface placement relative to the cornea. The changes in lens curvatures, whether surface or internal, have been characterized as a function of accommodation and subject age by use of quantitative analysis of Scheimpflug slit-lamp photographic images. Radii of curvature of the major lens refractive surfaces–the external and nuclear boundaries–decrease linearly with increasing accommodation in all eyes that are capable of accommodation. The rates at which they change with accommodation are age dependent, decreasing steadily toward zero with increased age. For the curves visible in each lens half, arising from boundaries between adjacent zones of discontinuity, radius of curvature and location are linearly related over the entire accommodative range for a given lens and over the age range for the population. The slope of this relationship changes with both accommodation and age, decreasing linearly in both cases. The relationship between these geometric changes and the loss of accommodative amplitude is discussed.