Treating cytomegalovirus retinitis-related retinal detachment by combining silicone oil tamponade and ganciclovir implant.

Publications // Ronald Danis // Mar 01 2002

PubMed ID: 11942545

Author(s): Martidis A, Danis RP, Ciulla TA. Treating cytomegalovirus retinitis-related retinal detachment by combining silicone oil tamponade and ganciclovir implant. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers. 2002 Mar-Apr;33(2):135-9. PMID 11942545

Journal: Ophthalmic Surgery And Lasers, Volume 33, Issue 2,

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE With the efficacy of pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil infusion in treating cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis-related retinal detachment and the success of the ganciclovir implant in controlling CMV retinitis, we sought to evaluate the possible benefits of combining these two procedures in one surgical operation.

PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective review of 10 patients was conducted. Each patient was diagnosed with a CMV retinitis-related retinal detachment and treated with pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil infusion, with simultaneous placement of a ganciclovir implant. Parameters evaluated included location of retinal detachment, reattachment rate, pre- and post-operative Snellen visual acuity, pre- and post-operative CMV retinitis activity and location, and complications of the combined procedure.

RESULTS Overall anatomic reattachment was achieved in all 10 patients. Four patients presented with macular involvement of their retinal detachments. Three of these patients experienced significant post-operative improvement in visual acuity. Surgery preserved visual acuity in the 6 patients who presented with macula attached. Best postoperative acuity was better than or equal to 20/100 in 7 (70%) patients. All 3 CMV retinitis patients with inactive retinitis preoperatively remained free of retinitis for the duration of follow up. At last follow up, 8/10 (80%) showed no active CMV retinitis and no patients experienced progression of their retinitis.

CONCLUSIONS Results of this series indicate that patients benefit from excellent anatomic reattachment rates, preservation or improvement of visual acuity in most cases, and extended control of their CMV retinitis. Combining the two procedures appears viable. Further study is warranted to assess definitive anatomic and functional outcomes resulting from this new technique.