Light-microscopy evaluation of zonular fiber morphology in dogs with glaucoma: secondary to lens displacement.

Publications // Richard Dubielzig // Mar 01 2005

PubMed ID: 15762920

Author(s): Morris RA, Dubielzig RR. Light-microscopy evaluation of zonular fiber morphology in dogs with glaucoma: secondary to lens displacement. Vet Ophthalmol. 2005 Mar-Apr;8(2):81-4. PMID 15762920

Journal: Veterinary Ophthalmology, Volume 8, Issue 2,

Lens displacement resulting in secondary glaucoma is common in terrier breeds. This study was carried out to evaluate whether light microscopy was useful in detecting abnormal patterns in zonular fiber protein. Eyes from 63 dogs with glaucoma secondary to lens displacement were evaluated for the presence of abnormal zonular fiber morphology using the following stains: hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid Schiff (PAS), Masson’s trichrome and Verhoeff’s elastin stains. Two distinct forms of abnormal zonular fiber morphology were recognized and designated as zonular fiber dysplasia (ZFD) and zonular fiber collagenization (ZFC). ZFD protein morphology was characterized by being tightly adherent to the nonpigmented ciliary body epithelium, exhibiting a distinct lamellar and cross-hatched pattern and staining strongly positive with PAS and trichrome stains, and staining negative with elastin stains. ZFD was predominant in terrier breeds (18 of 29) and Shar-Pei dogs (4 of 29). ZFC abnormality was characterized by excessive zonular fiber that was not tightly adherent to the ciliary body epithelium and staining positive with PAS, trichrome (blue for collagen) and elastin stains. Only 7 of 19 dogs with ZFC changes were terrier breeds, and there was no pattern in the breeds affected. Fifteen of the 63 dogs used in the study had normal appearing zonular fibers. The staining pattern in these dogs matched normal controls by staining positive with PAS and Verhoeff’s elastin stains and had only minimal positive staining with Masson’s trichrome stain. Results suggest that light microscopy is useful in detecting breed-related changes in zonular fiber morphology in cases of glaucoma secondary to lens displacement. These changes may correlate with the presence of abnormal zonular fiber proteins and might be important in the pathogenesis of primary lens displacement in terrier and Shar-Pei dogs.