The association between serum uric acid level and long-term incidence of hypertension: Population-based cohort study.

Kleins Lab // Publications // Dec 01 2006

PubMed ID: 17024135

Author(s): Shankar A, Klein R, Klein BE, Nieto FJ. The association between serum uric acid level and long-term incidence of hypertension: Population-based cohort study. J Hum Hypertens. 2006 Dec;20(12):937-45. Epub 2006 Oct 5. PMID 17024135

Journal: Journal Of Human Hypertension, Volume 20, Issue 12, Dec 2006

Increasing experimental evidence, including recently developed animal models support a causal role for uric acid in the development of hypertension. However, it is not clear whether serum uric acid levels are independently associated with the long-term incidence of hypertension. We examined the association between serum uric acid levels and 10-year incidence of hypertension in a population-based cohort study based in Beaver Dam city and township, Wisconsin, US. We studied 2520 hypertension-free individuals (56.3% women, age: 43-84 years, 98% Caucasian) at the baseline examination (1988-1990). The main outcome of interest was hypertension (systolic blood pressure (BP) of 140 mm Hg or higher, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or higher, or combination of self-reported high BP diagnosis and use of antihypertensive medications) incidence over 10 years among baseline normotensive individuals. Nine hundred and fifty-six individuals developed hypertension over a 10-year follow-up period. The relative risk (RR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) of incident hypertension increased in a dose-dependent manner (P-trend or =390 micromol/l) to the lowest quartile (< or =260 micromol/l) was 1.65 (1.41-1.93). This association persisted in subgroup analyses by categories of smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index, baseline blood pressure and estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In conclusion, increasing quartiles of serum uric acid was associated with 10-year incidence of hypertension independent of smoking, alcohol intake and baseline kidney function suggesting an independent positive association between serum uric acid levels and hypertension development among community-dwelling older adults.