Reproducibility of macular thickness and volume using Zeiss optical coherence tomography in patients with diabetic macular edema.

Matthew Davis // Publications // Ronald Danis // Aug 01 2007

PubMed ID: 17353052

Author(s): Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network, Krzystolik MG, Strauber SF, Aiello LP, Beck RW, Berger BB, Bressler NM, Browning DJ, Chambers RB, Danis RP, Davis MD, Glassman AR, Gonzalez VH, Greenberg PB, Gross JG, Kim JE, Kollman C. Reproducibility of macular thickness and volume using Zeiss optical coherence tomography in patients with diabetic macular edema. Ophthalmology. 2007 Aug;114(8):1520-5. Epub 2007 Mar 13. PMID 17353052

Journal: Ophthalmology, Volume 114, Issue 8, Aug 2007

PURPOSE To evaluate optical coherence tomography (OCT) reproducibility in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME).

DESIGN Prospective 1-day observational study.

PARTICIPANTS Two hundred twelve eyes of 107 patients with DME involving the macular center by clinical examination and OCT central subfield thickness of > or =225 microm.

METHODS Retinal thickness was measured with the OCT3 system, and scans were evaluated by a reading center. Reproducibility of retinal thickness measurements was assessed, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for a change in thickness were estimated.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Reproducibility of OCT-measured central subfield thickness.

RESULTS Reproducibility was better for central subfield thickness than for center point thickness (half-width of the 95% CI for absolute change, 38 microm vs. 50 microm, and for relative change, 11% vs. 17%, respectively; P<0.001). The median absolute difference between replicate measurements of the central subfield was 7 microm (2%). Half-widths of the 95% CI for a change in central subfield thickness were 22, 23, 33, and 56 microm for scans with central subfield thicknesses of <200, 200 to <250, 250 to or =400 microm, respectively. When expressed as percentage differences between 2 measurements, half-widths of the 95% CI for a change in central subfield thickness were 10%, 10%, 10%, and 13% for scans with central subfield thicknesses of <200, 200 to <250, 250 to or =400 microm, respectively. We were unable to identify an effect on reproducibility of central subfield measurements with respect to the presence of cystoid abnormalities, subretinal fluid, vitreomacular traction, or reduced visual acuity. Reproducibility was better when both scans had a standard deviation (SD) of the center point of <10.0% (half-width of the 95% CI for change, 33 microm vs. 56 microm; P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS Reproducibility is better for central subfield thickness measurements than for center point measurements, and variability is less with retinal thickness when expressed as a percent change than when expressed as an absolute change. A change in central subfield thickness exceeding 11% is likely to be real. Scans with an SD of the center point of > or =10.0% are less reproducible and should be viewed with caution when assessing the validity of an observed change in retinal thickness in patients with DME.