Unusual case of persistent Horner’s syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section.

Cat Burkat // Publications // Sep 01 2011

PubMed ID: 21836349

Author(s): Goel S, Burkat CN. Unusual case of persistent Horner’s syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section. Indian J Ophthalmol. 2011 Sep-Oct;59(5):389-91. doi: 10.4103/0301-4738.83620. PMID 21836349

Journal: Indian Journal Of Ophthalmology, Volume 59, Issue 5,

This is a rare case of persistent Horner’s syndrome following epidural anesthesia and Caesarean section. A 33-year-old female presented with persistent ptosis and miosis following epidural anesthesia and Caesarian section several months prior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. Medline search using terms Horner’s, epidural, spinal anesthesia, delivery, childbirth, Caesarian, and pregnancy identified 31 articles describing Horner’s syndrome in obstetric epidural anesthesia, of which 11 were following Caesarean section. The increased incidence of Horner’s syndrome in the setting of epidural anesthesia in pregnancy may be related to epidural venous engorgement and cephalic spread of the local anaesthetic, with disruption in the oculosympathetic pathway. It is important to include recent epidural anesthesia within the differential diagnosis of acute Horner’s syndrome in a postpartum female. Rarely, the ptosis may be permanent and require surgical intervention.