Canine ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin.

Publications // Richard Dubielzig // Mar 01 2013

PubMed ID: 22812389

Author(s): Duke FD, Strong TD, Bentley E, Dubielzig RR. Canine ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin. Vet Ophthalmol. 2013 Mar;16(2):159-62. doi: 10.1111/j.1463-5224.2012.01050.x. Epub 2012 Jul 19. PMID 22812389

Journal: Veterinary Ophthalmology, Volume 16, Issue 2, Mar 2013

Iridociliary tumors are the second most common primary ocular tumor in dogs and are usually benign. A review of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database in 2009 suggested a potential correlation between malignant iridociliary epithelial tumors and ciliary body ablation by intravitreal gentamicin injection for the treatment of glaucoma. The purpose of this case series was to determine whether there is evidence of such a correlation in the COPLOW collection. Mining of the COPLOW database revealed that a significant number (39.5%) of canine globes with a history of ciliary body ablation were subsequently diagnosed with primary ocular tumors at enucleation, most commonly iridociliary epithelial tumors and melanocytic tumors. It is possible that neoplasia was present but unrecognized at the time of ciliary body ablation. These tumors had a higher than expected incidence of malignancy. These cases underscore the importance of reserving ciliary body ablation with gentamicin for disease-free eyes.

© 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.