Pulse wave velocity and cognitive function in older adults.

Cruickshanks Lab // Kleins Lab // Publications // Jan 01 2014

PubMed ID: 23632267

Author(s): Zhong W, Cruickshanks KJ, Schubert CR, Carlsson CM, Chappell RJ, Klein BE, Klein R, Acher CW. Pulse wave velocity and cognitive function in older adults. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2014 Jan-Mar;28(1):44-9. doi: 10.1097/WAD.0b013e3182949f06. PMID 23632267

Journal: Alzheimer Disease And Associated Disorders, Volume 28, Issue 1,

Arterial stiffness may be associated with cognitive function. In this study, pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured from the carotid to femoral (CF-PWV) and from the carotid to radial (CR-PWV) with the Complior SP System. Cognitive function was measured by 6 tests of executive function, psychomotor speed, memory, and language fluency. A total of 1433 participants were included (mean age 75 y, 43% men). Adjusting for age, sex, education, pulse rate, hemoglobin A1C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, cardiovascular disease history, smoking, drinking, and depression symptoms, a CF-PWV>12 m/s was associated with a lower Mini-Mental State Examination score (coefficient: -0.31, SE: 0.11, P=0.005), fewer words recalled on Auditory Verbal Learning Test (coefficient: -1.10, SE: 0.43, P=0.01), and lower score on the composite cognition score (coefficient: -0.10, SE: 0.05, P=0.04) and marginally significantly associated with longer time to complete Trail Making Test-part B (coefficient: 6.30, SE: 3.41, P=0.06), CF-PWV was not associated with Trail Making Test-part A, Digit Symbol Substation Test, or Verbal Fluency Test. No associations were found between CR-PWV and cognitive performance measures. Higher large artery stiffness was associated with worse cognitive function, and longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these associations.