Spontaneous superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis: a rare entity with potentially devastating consequences.

Mark Lucarelli // Publications // Mar 01 2014

PubMed ID: 24357838

Author(s): Lim LH, Scawn RL, Whipple KM, Oh SR, Lucarelli MJ, Korn BS, Kikkawa DO. Spontaneous superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis: a rare entity with potentially devastating consequences. Eye (Lond). 2014 Mar;28(3):348-51. doi: 10.1038/eye.2013.273. Epub 2013 Dec 20. PMID 24357838

Journal: Eye (London, England), Volume 28, Issue 3, Mar 2014

PURPOSE Spontaneous superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis (SOVT) is a rare entity. We describe three patients with spontaneous ophthalmic vein thrombosis, each with various risk factors.

PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective review of three patients with a diagnosis of superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis. Clinical characteristics, radiographic features, management techniques and outcomes are described.

RESULTS All patients presented with unilateral painful proptosis. Two patients had intact light perception, whereas one patient presented with absent light perception. All patients had identifiable risk factors for thrombosis, which included sickle cell trait, hereditary hemorrhagic telangectasia and colon cancer with recurrent deep vein thrombosis. Anticoagulation was initiated in two patients. Resolution of proptosis was seen in all patients, with no recovery of vision in one patient.

CONCLUSIONS Risk factors for spontaneous superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis are multifactorial. MRI and MRV confirm the diagnosis of SOVT. Despite urgent intervention devastating visual loss may occur.