Matricellular protein thrombospondins: influence on ocular angiogenesis, wound healing and immuneregulation.

Publications // Sheibani Lab // Aug 01 2014

PubMed ID: 24559320

Author(s): Masli S, Sheibani N, Cursiefen C, Zieske J. Matricellular protein thrombospondins: influence on ocular angiogenesis, wound healing and immuneregulation. Curr Eye Res. 2014 Aug;39(8):759-74. doi: 10.3109/02713683.2013.877936. Epub 2014 Feb 21. Review. PMID 24559320

Journal: Current Eye Research, Volume 39, Issue 8, Aug 2014

Thrombospondins are a family of large multi-domain glycoproteins described as matricelluar proteins based on their ability to interact with a broad range of receptors, matrix molecules, growth factors or proteases, and to modulate array of cellular functions including intracellular signaling, proliferation and migration. Two members of the thrombospondin family, thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) and thrombospondin 2 (TSP-2) are studied extensively to determine their structure and function. While expressed at low levels in normal adult tissues, their increased expression is seen predominantly in response to cellular perturbations. Despite structural similarities, a notable functional difference between TSP-1 and TSP-2 includes the ability of former to activate of latent TGF-β and its competitive inhibition by the latter. Both these thrombospondins are reported to play important roles in TGF-β rich ocular environment with most reports related to TSP-1. They are expressed by many ocular cell types and detectable in the aqueous and vitreous humor. TSP-1 and TSP-2 influence many cellular interactions in the eye such as angiogenesis, cell migration, wound healing, TGF-β activation and regulation of inflammatory immune responses. Together, these processes are known to contribute to the immune privilege status of the eye. Emerging roles of TSP-1 and TSP-2 in ocular functions and pathology are reviewed here.