The consequences of avian ocular trauma: histopathological evidence and implications of acute and chronic disease.

Publications // Richard Dubielzig // Nov 01 2017

PubMed ID: 28070965

Author(s): Moore BA, Teixeira LBC, Sponsel WE, Dubielzig RR. The consequences of avian ocular trauma: histopathological evidence and implications of acute and chronic disease. Vet Ophthalmol. 2017 Nov;20(6):496-504. doi: 10.1111/vop.12453. Epub 2017 Jan 10. PMID 28070965

Journal: Veterinary Ophthalmology, Volume 20, Issue 6, Nov 2017

OBJECTIVE To present a description and categorization of the histopathological lesions in avian ocular trauma.

ANIMAL STUDIED Seventy-five birds diagnosed with ocular trauma at to the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin.

PROCEDURES Histological slides were reviewed, and the type of trauma was classified by cause into either (i) blunt trauma or (ii) penetrating trauma and by duration into (i) acute or (ii) chronic.

RESULTS Blunt trauma was the most common source of trauma, and the most frequent lesions were observed in the retina (91%), with 71% of retinas having a tear or detachment and 46% of retinas showing chronic degenerative changes. Damage to the iris/ciliary body was present in 77% of cases. Corneal (17%) and lens (31%) lesions were relatively low. Acute traumatic events had a higher prevalence of readily identifiable discrete retinal tears/detachments (64%). Nearly all cases of chronic trauma exhibited chronic retinal lesions (93.7%), as well as a greater percentage of cartilage/bone lesions (71.4%), irido/cyclodialysis (51.9%), lenticular lesions (72.7%), and corneal damage (83.3%). However, the incidence of iridocyclodialysis was roughly equivalent for acute and chronic blunt trauma.

CONCLUSIONS Ocular trauma can lead to profound acute and chronic lesions within the eye. Here, we provide insight into understanding ocular damage caused by trauma, which may help future studies suggest new therapeutic options and provide insight regarding the releasability of avian wildlife.

© 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.