Age does not affect contractile responses of the isolated rhesus monkey ciliary muscle to muscarinic agonists.

Kaufman Lab // Publications // May 01 1993

PubMed ID: 8102090

Author(s): Poyer JF, Kaufman PL, Flügel C. Age does not affect contractile responses of the isolated rhesus monkey ciliary muscle to muscarinic agonists. Curr Eye Res. 1993 May;12(5):413-22. PMID 8102090

Journal: Current Eye Research, Volume 12, Issue 5, May 1993

In primates, ciliary muscle contraction causes accommodation and facilitates aqueous outflow. In living rhesus monkeys, accommodative, outflow facility, and ciliary muscle movement responses to cholinergic agonists all decline with age. We developed an apparatus to determine in vitro whether the latter is related to intra- or extra-ciliary muscle factors, and whether ciliary muscle contraction in the coronal (putatively more accommodation-relevant) and longitudinal (putatively more facility-relevant) vectors can be dissociated pharmacologically. In fresh ciliary muscle strips, carbachol and aceclidine each induced dose-dependent contraction in the longitudinal and coronal vectors. With neither drug was there any apparent dissociation of the responses in the two vectors. Atropine pretreatment completely prevented a supramaximal dose of carbachol from inducing ciliary muscle contraction in either vector. Ciliary muscle strips responded to several cholinergic agonists as well on day 2 (24-32 hours post-enucleation) as on day 1 (1-9 hours post-enucleation) when kept in a cell culture medium at 4 degrees C. By light microscopy, the general architecture of the ciliary muscle, the muscle bundles, and the single muscle cells appeared normal; however, cellular and nuclear swelling were apparent following the 32-hour culturing period. Contractile responses to near-maximal doses of carbachol and aceclidine did not vary markedly with age in either vector, suggesting that the age-related decrease in ciliary muscle mobility in vivo is due to extra-muscular restrictive factors rather than diminished muscular contractility.