Anterior transposition of the superior oblique tendon in the treatment of oculomotor nerve palsy and its influence on postoperative hypertropia.

Publications // Young Lab // May 01 2000

PubMed ID: 10845415

Author(s): Young TL, Conahan BM, Summers CG, Egbert JE. Anterior transposition of the superior oblique tendon in the treatment of oculomotor nerve palsy and its influence on postoperative hypertropia. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2000 May-Jun;37(3):149-55. PMID 10845415

Journal: Journal Of Pediatric Ophthalmology And Strabismus, Volume 37, Issue 3,

PURPOSE To determine whether postoperative hypertropia after anterior transposition of the superior oblique tendon without trochleotomy could be avoided with a simplified surgical approach.

METHODS Eight patients with oculomotor nerve palsy (one patient was bilaterally affected) were retrospectively identified as having undergone anterior transposition of the superior oblique tendon without trochleotomy or vertical rectus muscle surgery between March 1992 and September 1998. The superior oblique tendon was cut at the medial border of the superior rectus muscle and placed 1-3.5 mm anterior to the medial insertion of the superior rectus muscle in each of these patients. Resection of the superior oblique tendon was not performed. The lateral rectus muscle was weakened, and no vertical rectus muscles were resected.

RESULTS Preoperative deviations with the uninvolved eye fixating in primary position ranged from 20-90 prism diopters (delta) of exotropia (mean: 49.3 delta) and from 0-20 delta of hypotropia (mean: 11.25 delta). Postoperative horizontal deviations in the primary gaze position ranged from 12 delta of exotropia to 20 delta of esotropia. Six cases were aligned within 10 delta of exotropia or esotropia. Postoperative vertical deviations in the primary gaze position ranged from 2 delta of hypertropia to 8 delta of hypotropia. Six cases were aligned within 2 delta of deviation. Significant postoperative restrictive hypertropia, or new postoperative paradoxical ocular movements, did not occur in any patient. Patients who underwent follow-up >4 months maintained stable eye alignment.

CONCLUSION Transposition of the superior oblique tendon without simultaneous resection or trochleotomy, or additional surgery to the vertical rectus muscle simplifies the surgical technique and eliminates subjective decision making regarding the amount of resection.