Early age-related macular degeneration, cognitive function, and dementia: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

Kleins Lab // Publications // May 01 2009

PubMed ID: 19433718

Author(s): Baker ML, Wang JJ, Rogers S, Klein R, Kuller LH, Larsen EK, Wong TY. Early age-related macular degeneration, cognitive function, and dementia: the Cardiovascular Health Study. Arch Ophthalmol. 2009 May;127(5):667-73. doi: 10.1001/archophthalmol.2009.30. PMID 19433718

Journal: Archives Of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), Volume 127, Issue 5, May 2009

OBJECTIVE To describe the association of cognitive function and dementia with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in older individuals.

METHODS This population-based study included 2,088 persons aged 69 to 97 years who participated in the Cardiovascular Health Study. The AMD was assessed from retinal photographs based on a modified Wisconsin AMD grading system. Cognitive function was assessed using the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST) and the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination. Participants were also evaluated for dementia using detailed neuropsychological testing.

RESULTS After controlling for age, sex, race, and study center, persons with low DSST scores (lowest quartile of scores, < or =30) were more likely to have early AMD (odds ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.85) than were persons with higher DSST scores. In analyses further controlling for education, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol level, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, and apolipoprotein E genotype, this association was stronger (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-3.10). There was no association of low Modified Mini-Mental State Examination scores, dementia, or Alzheimer disease with early AMD.

CONCLUSIONS In this older population, cognitive impairment may share common age-related pathogenesis and risk factors with early AMD.