The practice of ophthalmology in rural Wisconsin in the mid-19th century: from the casebooks of Francis Paddock, MD.

Daniel Albert // Publications // Sarah Atzen // Jun 01 2010

PubMed ID: 20547958

Author(s): Albert DM, Atzen SL, Morgan P. The practice of ophthalmology in rural Wisconsin in the mid-19th century: from the casebooks of Francis Paddock, MD. Arch Ophthalmol. 2010 Jun;128(6):783-8. doi: 10.1001/archophthalmol.2010.80. PMID 20547958

Journal: Archives Of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), Volume 128, Issue 6, Jun 2010

Francis Paddock (1814-1889), a graduate of Fairfield Medical College in western New York State, opened a general medicinal and surgical practice in the small town of Salem in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, between 1838 and 1839, where he lived and worked until his death a half century later. Two early volumes of his casebooks, spanning the years 1841 to 1852, came to light and are now analyzed from the standpoint of ophthalmic-related problems and their treatment. His life as a frontier physician and leading citizen of his community are documented in the context of 19th-century medicine in America and Wisconsin.