Benefits of Renin-Angiotensin blockade on retinopathy in type 1 diabetes vary with glycemic control.

Kleins Lab // Publications // Aug 01 2011

PubMed ID: 21715517

Author(s): Harindhanavudhi T, Mauer M, Klein R, Zinman B, Sinaiko A, Caramori ML; Renin Angiotensin System Study (RASS) group. Benefits of Renin-Angiotensin blockade on retinopathy in type 1 diabetes vary with glycemic control. Diabetes Care. 2011 Aug;34(8):1838-42. doi: 10.2337/dc11-0476. Epub 2011 Jun 29. PMID 21715517

Journal: Diabetes Care, Volume 34, Issue 8, Aug 2011

OBJECTIVE Optimal glycemic control slows diabetic retinopathy (DR) development and progression and is the standard of care for type 1 diabetes. However, these glycemic goals are difficult to achieve and sustain in clinical practice. The Renin Angiotensin System Study (RASS) showed that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade can slow DR progression. In the current study, we evaluate whether glycemic control influenced the benefit of RAS blockade on DR progression in type 1 diabetic patients.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used RASS data to analyze the relationships between two-steps or more DR progression and baseline glycemic levels in 223 normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients randomized to receive 5 years of enalapril or losartan compared with placebo.

RESULTS A total of 147 of 223 patients (65.9%) had DR at baseline (47 of 74 patients [63.5%] in placebo and 100 of 149 patients [67.1%] in the combined treatment groups [P = 0.67]). Patients with two-steps or more DR progression had higher baseline A1C than those without progression (9.4 vs. 8.2%, P 7.5% had two-steps or more DR progression compared with 26 of 56 patients (46%) in the placebo group (P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS RAS blockade reduces DR progression in normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients with A1C >7.5%. Whether this therapy could benefit patients with A1C ≤7.5% will require long-term studies of much larger cohorts.