Marrow-derived cells regulate the development of early diabetic retinopathy and tactile allodynia in mice.

Publications // Sheibani Lab // Dec 01 2012

PubMed ID: 22923475

Author(s): Li G, Veenstra AA, Talahalli RR, Wang X, Gubitosi-Klug RA, Sheibani N, Kern TS. Marrow-derived cells regulate the development of early diabetic retinopathy and tactile allodynia in mice. Diabetes. 2012 Dec;61(12):3294-303. doi: 10.2337/db11-1249. Epub 2012 Aug 24. PMID 22923475

Journal: Diabetes, Volume 61, Issue 12, Dec 2012

The hypothesis that marrow-derived cells, and specifically proinflammatory proteins in those cells, play a critical role in the development of diabetes-induced retinopathy and tactile allodynia was investigated. Abnormalities characteristic of the early stages of retinopathy and allodynia were measured in chimeric mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) or poly(ADP-ribosyl) polymerase (PARP1) in only their marrow-derived cells. Diabetes-induced capillary degeneration, proinflammatory changes, and superoxide production in the retina and allodynia were inhibited in diabetic animals in which iNOS or PARP1 was deleted from bone marrow cells only. Of the various marrow cells, neutrophils (and monocytes) play a major role in retinopathy development, because retinal capillary degeneration likewise was significantly inhibited in diabetic mice lacking the receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in their marrow-derived cells. Immunodepletion of neutrophils or monocytes inhibited the endothelial death otherwise observed when coculturing leukocytes from wild-type diabetic animals with retinal endothelium. iNOS and PARP1 are known to play a role in inflammatory processes, and we conclude that proinflammatory processes within marrow-derived cells play a central role in the development of diabetes complications in the retina and nerve.