Comparison of ultrasonography and histologic examination for identification of ocular diseases of animals: 113 cases (2000-2010).

Publications // Richard Dubielzig // Aug 01 2013

PubMed ID: 23865880

Author(s): Gallhoefer NS, Bentley E, Ruetten M, Grest P, Haessig M, Kircher PR, Dubielzig RR, Spiess BM, Pot SA. Comparison of ultrasonography and histologic examination for identification of ocular diseases of animals: 113 cases (2000-2010). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013 Aug 1;243(3):376-88. doi: 10.2460/javma.243.3.376. PMID 23865880

Journal: Journal Of The American Veterinary Medical Association, Volume 243, Issue 3, Aug 2013

OBJECTIVE To compare ultrasonographic and histologic examination findings for eyes of animals with ocular diseases.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 116 eyes of 113 animals examined at 2 facilities.

PROCEDURES Diseased eyes of animals were examined by means of ultrasonography, removed via enucleation or exenteration, then histologically examined. Ultrasonographic images and histopathologic slides were evaluated, and diseases of eyes were identified with each of those methods and allocated to various categories. For each disease category, agreement between results of ultrasonography and those of histologic examination was assessed via determination of κ statistic values.

RESULTS Tests had good agreement for identification of iris or ciliary body neoplasia. Overall, intraocular neoplasia was not detected via ultrasonography for only 2 of 31 eyes with histologically detected neoplasia. Hemorrhagic or inflammatory changes were misinterpreted as neoplasia for 8 of 37 (22%) eyes. Tests had moderate to acceptable agreement for identification of retinal detachment. Retinal detachment was not detected by means of ultrasonography for 14 of 38 (37%) eyes with that diagnosis determined via histologic examination at one of the facilities (primarily in eyes with intraocular hemorrhage); however, retinal detachment was not identified via histologic examination for 6 of 38 (16%) eyes with that diagnosis determined via ultrasonography at the other facility.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Agreement between tests evaluated in this study was clinically satisfactory for identification of intraocular neoplasia. Typically, diseases were misdiagnosed via ultrasonography for eyes with poor image contrast. Because determination of ultrasonographic diagnoses of retinal detachment and intraocular neoplasm may be of prognostic importance, performance of additional ultrasonographic techniques may be indicated.