At the interface of sensory and motor dysfunctions and Alzheimer’s disease.

Cruickshanks Lab // Publications // Jan 01 2015

PubMed ID: 25022540

Author(s): Albers MW, Gilmore GC, Kaye J, Murphy C, Wingfield A, Bennett DA, Boxer AL, Buchman AS, Cruickshanks KJ, Devanand DP, Duffy CJ, Gall CM, Gates GA, Granholm AC, Hensch T, Holtzer R, Hyman BT, Lin FR, McKee AC, Morris JC, Petersen RC, Silbert LC, Struble RG, Trojanowski JQ, Verghese J, Wilson DA, Xu S, Zhang LI. At the interface of sensory and motor dysfunctions and Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Jan;11(1):70-98. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.04.514. Epub 2014 Jul 9. Review. PMID 25022540

Journal: Alzheimer’s & Dementia : The Journal Of The Alzheimer’s Association, Volume 11, Issue 1, Jan 2015

Recent evidence indicates that sensory and motor changes may precede the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by several years and may signify increased risk of developing AD. Traditionally, sensory and motor dysfunctions in aging and AD have been studied separately. To ascertain the evidence supporting the relationship between age-related changes in sensory and motor systems and the development of AD and to facilitate communication between several disciplines, the National Institute on Aging held an exploratory workshop titled “Sensory and Motor Dysfunctions in Aging and AD.” The scientific sessions of the workshop focused on age-related and neuropathologic changes in the olfactory, visual, auditory, and motor systems, followed by extensive discussion and hypothesis generation related to the possible links among sensory, cognitive, and motor domains in aging and AD. Based on the data presented and discussed at this workshop, it is clear that sensory and motor regions of the central nervous system are affected by AD pathology and that interventions targeting amelioration of sensory-motor deficits in AD may enhance patient function as AD progresses.

Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer’s Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.