Effect of topical latanoprost 0.005% on intraocular pressure and pupil diameter in normal and glaucomatous cats.

Gillian McLellan // Kaufman Lab // Publications // Jul 01 2016

PubMed ID: 26183373

Author(s): McDonald JE, Kiland JA, Kaufman PL, Bentley E, Ellinwood NM, McLellan GJ. Effect of topical latanoprost 0.005% on intraocular pressure and pupil diameter in normal and glaucomatous cats. Vet Ophthalmol. 2016 Jul;19 Suppl 1:13-23. doi: 10.1111/vop.12292. Epub 2015 Jul 16. PMID 26183373

Journal: Veterinary Ophthalmology, Volume 19 Suppl 1, Jul 2016

OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of latanoprost on intraocular pressure (IOP) and pupil diameter (PD) in cats with inherited primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) and normal cats.

ANIMALS STUDIED AND PROCEDURES IOP and PD were measured in both eyes (OU) of 12 adult cats (six normal, six PCG), three times per week for 3 weeks prior to, for 3 weeks during, and for 2 weeks following twice-daily treatment with 0.005% latanoprost to the right eye (OD) and vehicle to the left (control) eye (OS). IOP and PD were measured hourly, for 8 h, 1 day prior to, and on the first and last days of treatment. Aqueous humor flow rate (AHF) was determined at baseline and at the end of the treatment phase in six normal cats.

RESULTS Mean IOP was significantly lower in treated vs. control eyes of PCG cats, for up to 8 h following a single latanoprost treatment, and a maximal IOP reduction of 63% occurred in treated eyes at 3 h. Latanoprost acutely lowered IOP in cats with PCG, but this effect appeared to diminish over 3 weeks of treatment. AHF was modestly increased in the treated eyes of normal cats after 3 weeks of latanoprost treatment, although IOP was not significantly affected. Latanoprost caused miosis, with rebound mydriasis at 24 h posttreatment, in the treated eyes of all cats.

CONCLUSIONS Further research is needed to determine the suitability and efficacy of latanoprost treatment for long-term IOP-lowering in cats with PCG or other forms of glaucoma.

© 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.