Ultrahigh resolution retinal imaging by visible light OCT with longitudinal achromatization.

Alfredo Dubra // Publications // Apr 01 2018

PubMed ID: 29675296

Author(s): Chong SP, Zhang T, Kho A, Bernucci MT, Dubra A, Srinivasan VJ. Ultrahigh resolution retinal imaging by visible light OCT with longitudinal achromatization. Biomed Opt Express. 2018 Mar 5;9(4):1477-1491. doi: 10.1364/BOE.9.001477. eCollection 2018 Apr 1. PMID 29675296

Journal: Biomedical Optics Express, Volume 9, Issue 4, Apr 2018

Chromatic aberrations are an important design consideration in high resolution, high bandwidth, refractive imaging systems that use visible light. Here, we present a fiber-based spectral/Fourier domain, visible light OCT ophthalmoscope corrected for the average longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) of the human eye. Analysis of complex speckles from in vivo retinal images showed that achromatization resulted in a speckle autocorrelation function that was ~20% narrower in the axial direction, but unchanged in the transverse direction. In images from the improved, achromatized system, the separation between Bruch’s membrane (BM), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and the outer segment tips clearly emerged across the entire 6.5 mm field-of-view, enabling segmentation and morphometry of BM and the RPE in a human subject. Finally, cross-sectional images depicted distinct inner retinal layers with high resolution. Thus, with chromatic aberration compensation, visible light OCT can achieve volume resolutions and retinal image quality that matches or exceeds ultrahigh resolution near-infrared OCT systems with no monochromatic aberration compensation.