diabetic eye disease

Presented by the UW Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

 

Monice Vetter, PhDKeynote Speaker: MOnica Vetter, PhD – UNiversity of Utah – Chair of the Department of neurobiology and Anatomy

Dr. Vetter’s laboratory is focused on understanding the molecular pathways controlling neural development and degeneration in the retina. The retina is of critical importance since disorders of eye development can lead to congenital blindness, while degeneration of retinal neurons can cause progressive blindness at later ages.

Featured Speakers:

  • Michael G. Anderson, PhD, Professor of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics; Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences within the Carver College of Medicine at the University of Iowa
  • Amy Lee, PhD, Professor of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Otolaryngology Head-Neck Surgery, and Neurology Assistant Dean for Research within the Carver College of Medicine at the University of Iowa
  • Katie M. Litts, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow within the Advanced Ocular Imaging Program at the Medical College of Wisconsin Eye Institute

 

REGISTER HERE BY APRIL 5, 2019


OFFICIAL PROGRAM SCHEDULE:

8:00 – 8:20 AM   Breakfast and Registration 

8:20 – 8:30 AM   Chair’s Welcome: Terri Young, MD, MBA

Session I   Retina and the Visual Pathway // Moderator: Justin Gottlieb, MD

  • 8:30 – 8:50 AM Amy Lee, PhD // Cav1.4 Ca2+ Channels at the Photoreceptor Synapse
  • 8:50 – 9:10 AM Raunak Sinha, PhD // Diversity of Photoreceptor Signaling in Primate Retina
  • 9:10 – 9:30 AM Karen Schloss, PhD // The Role of Visual Reasoning in Visual Communication 
  • 9:30 – 9:50 AM Mrinalini Hoon, PhD // Development of Retinal Presynaptic Inhibitory Circuits 
  • 9:50 – 10.10 AM Krista Christensen, MPH, PhD // Macular Pigment and Low Luminance Vision in CAREDS

10:10 – 10:25 AM   Break

Session II  Glaucoma // Moderator: Gregg Heatley, MD, MMM

  • 10:25 – 10:45 AM  Michael Anderson, PhD // Using Quantitative Image Analysis to Empower Mouse studies of Glaucoma and Retinal Ganglion Cell Biology
  • 10:45 – 11:05 AM  Donna Peters, PhD // αVb3 Integrin Signaling Controls Intraocular Pressure
  • 11:05 – 11:25 AM  Colleen McDowell, PhD // TLR4 Signaling in The Human Trabecular Meshwork
  • 11:25 – 11:45 AM Gillian McLellan, BVMS, PhD, DACVO // Glaucomatous Optic Nerve Neuro-Inflammation and Degeneration
  • 11:45 – 12:00 PM Sri Meghana Konda, MBBS // Schlemm’s Canal Imaging, Pressure and Catheterization

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM   Buffet Lunch 

Session III  Ocular Pathologies // Moderator: Evan Warner, MD

  • 1:00 – 1:20 PM Katie Litts, PhD // Application of AOSLO Retinal Imaging in Achromatopsia 
  • 1:20 – 1:35 PM Kara Vogel, PhD // Vigabatrin: Synaptic Remodeling of Retinal Bipolar Cells
  • 1:35 – 1:50 PM Barbara Blodi, MD // Ellipsoid Zone Status and Its Association with Visual Acuity in Eyes with Macular Edema in SCORE 2
  • 1:50 – 2:10 PM Donna Neumann, PhD // The Link Between Ocular HSV-1 Recurrence and Chromatin Loops
  • 2:10 – 2:30 PM  Curtis Brandt, PhD // In Vitro Susceptibility of FHV-1 Field Strains to Ganciclovir

2:30 – 2:50 PM Break

2:50 – 3:50 PM   Keynote Speaker: Monica Vetter, PhD // Microglia: Dynamic Remodelers of the Developing Retina

3:50 – 4:00 PM   Closing Remarks: Terri Young, MD, MBA

 

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The 2019 Vision Research Symposium is supported by the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

George Kambara Education Fund and McPherson Eye Research Institute.

Free and open to the public, this community-centric event is modeled after the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health’s “Mini-Med School” programs. Our Spring 2019 Saving Sight Session will feature the leading research from the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Wisconsin. Please join us for this exciting discussion and light dinner.

   register here by april 1, 2019  

An Update on Diabetic Retinopathy: Diagnosis and Treatments

Justin Gottlieb, MDABOUT DR. GOTTLIEB

Justin L. Gottlieb, MD, is an ophthalmologist who sees patients in Madison, WI, and Rockford, IL, and has served as principal investigator for numerous clinical trials in diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and other retinal diseases. Dr. Gottlieb is principal investigator for the Madison site of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR), and served as co-principal investigator for the landmark Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), which investigated the effect of antioxidant vitamins and zinc on macular degeneration and cataract.

 

 

 

PROGRAM

  • 5:30-6:00PM – Registration and light dinner served (buffet style)
  • 6:00-7:00PM – Introduction >> Presentation >> Question/Answer Discussion

ABOUT SAVING SIGHT SESSIONS

Free and open to the public, this community-centric event is modeled after the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health’s “Mini-Med School” programs. Our Spring 2019 Saving Sight Session will feature the leading research from Justin L. Gottlieb, MD, Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Wisconsin. Please join us for this exciting discussion and light dinner.

 

   register here by april 1, 2019  

 

 

We welcome David Antonetti, PhD, Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology from Kellogg Eye Center at the University of Michigan, as he presents:

Blood-Retinal Barrier Regulation in Diabetic Retinopathy: New Insight and Opportunities.” 

 

We hope you will join us for this exciting discussion. Please RSVP for the event by emailing Jenny Priebe: priebe2@wisc.edu

About Dr. Antonetti’s Research:

Our long-term goal is to contribute to the development of novel treatments to prevent or reverse the debilitating loss of vision from diabetes. Our current research focuses on understanding how the blood-retinal barrier normally develops in the retina and how to restore normal barrier properties in diseases like diabetic retinopathy. This research has led our team to develop methods to regenerate normal retinal vascular function in models of diabetes. Ultimately, these studies may provide a path for the development of therapies to restore the blood-neural barrier in a variety of diseases including diabetic retinopathy or brain tumors.

ABOUT DR. ANTONETTI:

Dr. Antonetti received his PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology at The Penn State College of Medicine under the direction of Dr. Leonard Jim Jefferson and was a post-doctoral fellow in Cellular and Molecular Physiology at the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard Medical School under the direction of Dr. C. Ronald Kahn. Upon returning to Penn State, he was one of the first to bring high-level signal transduction expertise to the problem of diabetic retinopathy and the blood-retinal barrier. Over the last 20 years, he has become one of the world’s leading experts in mechanisms of vascular permeability in diabetic retinopathy, the role of the blood retinal barrier in normal physiology, and the molecular mechanisms that underlie angiogenesis and neovascularization. These efforts have allowed him to develop new experimental treatments that show promising pre-clinical results. He has received awards including the Jules Francois Prize for Young Investigator at Ophthalmologia Beligica, the Hinkle Society Mid-career Translational Research Award, and the Most Inspirational Teacher Award for graduate education at Penn State. He also holds the very prestigious Jules and Doris Stein Professorship from Research to Prevent Blindness. His work has been noted by presentations at key meetings such as the American Diabetes Association, the International Symposium of the Blood-Brain Barrier, Gordon Research Conferences, and the International Symposium on Signal Transduction at the Blood-Brain and Blood-Retina Barriers. Of particular note, his translational impact has been recognized by clinicians by his presentations at the American Uveitis Society, the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the ARVO Vision Innovation and Venture forum, and the University of Pittsburgh, Washington University, and Trinity College in Dublin.