The influence of combined kidney-pancreas transplantation on the progression of diabetic retinopathy. A case series.

Kleins Lab // Publications // Jun 01 1994

PubMed ID: 8008349

Author(s): Wang Q, Klein R, Moss SE, Klein BE, Hoyer C, Burke K, Sollinger HW. The influence of combined kidney-pancreas transplantation on the progression of diabetic retinopathy. A case series. Ophthalmology. 1994 Jun;101(6):1071-6.

Journal: Ophthalmology, Volume 101, Issue 6, Jun 1994

PURPOSE To evaluate the impact of combined kidney and pancreas transplantation on the progression of advanced diabetic retinopathy.

METHODS The changes in diabetic retinopathy severity in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who had kidney-pancreas transplantation (n = 51) and in those who had kidney transplantation only (n = 21) were compared. Patients were invited to baseline and 1 year follow-up examinations. Fundus photographs were graded in a masked fashion using standardized protocols.

RESULTS The mean age and duration of diabetes were similar for both groups. After combined transplantation, none of the patients used insulin, and their mean glycosylated hemoglobin was significantly lower (6.4% versus 10.6%) than those who underwent only kidney transplantation. There was a nonsignificant difference in overall progression of retinopathy for combined transplantation compared with kidney transplantation only (risk ratio = 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.31, 1.71).

CONCLUSION The authors found no evidence that the normalization of glycemia associated with a combined kidney-pancreas transplantation in patients with advanced proliferative diabetic retinopathy (mostly treated with photocoagulation) accelerated retinopathy progression. These data suggest that the normalization of glycemia associated with a combined kidney-pancreas transplantation does not have beneficial influence on the progression of advanced diabetic retinopathy.